6 Strategies For Creating An Inquiry-Driven Classroom

6 Strategies For Creating An Inquiry-Driven Classroom | Modern Education

6 Strategies For Creating An Inquiry-Driven Classroom by Irena Nayfeld, TeachThought PD Inquiry Workshop Facilitator Teachers of young children juggle a lot. There is literacy, math, science, social and emotional development, learning standards, the needs of each child, materials to make activities

The 6 Drivers of Inquiry-Based Learning

The 6 Drivers of Inquiry-Based Learning – Cooper on Curriculum

Inquiry-based learning can be defined as learning that “starts by posing questions, problems or scenarios – rather than simply presenting established facts or portraying a smooth path to knowledge.” In short, we uncover material, as opposed to content coverage and the memorization and regurgitation of facts and knowledge.

What the Heck Is Inquiry-Based Learning?

What the Heck Is Inquiry-Based Learning?

Inquiry-based learning is more than asking a student what he or she wants to know. It’s about triggering curiosity. And activating a student’s curiosity is, I would argue, a far more important and complex goal than the objective of mere information delivery. Nevertheless, despite its complexity, inquiry-based learning can be somehow easier on teachers, too.

Bringing Inquiry-Based Learning Into Your Class

Bringing Inquiry-Based Learning Into Your Class

Adopting an inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach in my classroom has been the most meaningful change I have made in my teaching. The benefit of increased student agency in learning, the authentic connections we make to the world around us, and the 21st-century skills IBL nurtures are great reasons to explore how inquiry can enhance what you are doing in your classroom.